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What’s the difference between boxes and cartons?

Whether you’re shipping or storing something, we want to make sure you get your packaging right. The terminology between the two words often gets mixed up. And lord knows there’s just way too many special jargon out there in the printing world.

So to make things easier to understand for the rest of us, I will provide a simple rule of thumb below:

What’s the difference?

While both boxes and cartons are made out of paper materials, cartons are usually thinner of the two. You’ll see it used in cereal boxes, milk cartons, pharmaceuticals, and more.

A box, on the other hand, uses thicker paper stock that is mostly meant for shipping. As it’s built for durability, you will most likely notice multiple layers of paper that include an inside and an outer layer with a ruffled shaped paper sandwiched in between. Probably very easy to imagine since most of us have opened up a UPS or Amazon package at some point.

What’s the best for your business?

Depending on the industry, your packaging material may vary. What’s used in the food industry will differ from the footwear industry of course. So if you’re looking for packaging that is:

  • Lightweight

  • Affordable

  • Safe

  • Customizable

  • Eco-friendly

  • Durable

  • Or Affordable

Common types of cardboard boxes

Many of us assume all cardboard boxes are the same and pretty basic, but it is their formation that makes them suitable for different uses.

The 3 most common types of cardboard used in packaging are, corrugated box, folding cartons and the rigid box. Each box starts off the same with cardboard sheets as the base but then enhanced further to suit its usage.

You’d be surprised how an extra layer of paper can make a huge difference to the strength and durability of the cardboard box.

There are many types of cardboard boxes out there for different purposes, but we’ll be going through the 3 main boxes that we see the most often.

1: Corrugated boxes

The most common type of box formation is the trusted corrugated box. This type of box is made up of 3 layers which consist of a corrugated fibreboard, paperboard and card stock.

A wavy sheet is glued between two outer flat layers, which is what we can usually see from all sides of the sheet.

This type of box is widely used across the world for industrial packaging and can be designed in a variety of colours, styles and sizes.

Properties of a corrugated box

  • Lightweight

  • Strong

  • Can be easily printed on

  • Available in various sizes and styles

  • Widely recyclable

2: Folding Cartons

Folding cartons are what you see usually in most retail and shopping stores. They are much lighter than a corrugated box, which makes them ideal for food packaging.

Cartons are simply made with paperboard that is usually printed, laminated and cut into shape before they are folded and ready to be transported to the packers. You’ll notice most cartons are designed with folded tabs, to make it easier for the box to lock without the need for extra adhesive.

Properties of a folding carton

  • Lightweight

  • Can be easily printed on

  • Widely recyclable

  • Available in various sizes and styles

3: Rigid Boxes

Rigid boxes, as their name suggests, are much sturdier and stronger than folding cartons. As they don’t fold or collapse, they are generally used for transporting more delicate items that are prone to damage during transportation.

You’ll often associate these types of boxes with higher end product packaging such an iPhone box.

Properties of a Rigid box

  • Strong

  • Available in different sizes and styles

  • Durable

What is the Difference Between Cardboard and Corrugated Shipping Boxes?

When ordering custom made shipping boxes to transport products to customers, many businesses initially assume that all boxes are merely made of cardboard. And if they have heard of corrugated, business owners might think there is no real difference between a cardboard and a corrugated shipping box. In fact, many people just assume that the terms “cardboard” and “corrugated” can be used interchangeably.

Those in the packaging industry, however, likely think of corrugated first when they think of shipping packages. If you’re confused with all this terminology, you’re not alone, but the difference is actually quite important.

Keep reading to learn more about the difference between these two materials and decide which is right for your shipping needs.

Cardboard and corrugated boxes are different in a number of key ways, from the materials used to the way they’re constructed. These differences may seem small to those outside of the industry, but anyone in the shipping and packaging business knows how important the difference can be.

The major differences between cardboard vs. corrugated boxes focus on:

  • The materials used to construct each type of box

  • The construction process required for assembly

  • The sturdiness of the finished product for shipping and storage purposes

When it comes down to it, the term “cardboard” can be used to describe any type of board made from heavy paper-pulp. This could apply to the material used to make greeting cards or playing cards, for example. It could also apply to the thin chipboard that is used to manufacture cereal boxes. While corrugated materials may include some cardboard in them, it’s important to know that these terms cannot be used interchangeably.So, for a business owner or manager, does the difference between cardboard and corrugated shipping materials really matter? Considering that these are two different materials, and not the same thing as many people believe, it clearly does matter. When choosing the right materials to ship your products in, you need to know what kind of packaging you’re actually getting. Otherwise, you may not be representing your brand as well as you think you are.

The term “corrugated” refers to a specific type of material that is actually composed of three different sheets of container board, which are basically like thick paperboard. The two sheets on the outside are flat liners and the sheet in the middle has a rippled shape. A corrugated fiberboard sheet is created by gluing these three sheets together with a thick, starchy glue that is commonly used in the packaging industry.

When formed into boxes, corrugated sheets are ideal for shipping because they can easily be printed on, they are very strong and durable, and they are widely recycled. Corrugated boxes are used for everything from shipping to product displays, and although they start out brown they can be quickly be transformed with a wide variety of colors, designs, text, and graphics printed directly on the material.

While the differences may seem insignificant at first, it should now be easy to see that cardboard is better left for the cards and cereal boxes. Corrugated, on the other hand, is the material of choice for shipping boxes. It isn’t an overly complicated definition, but an important one to remember when it comes time to order custom made shipping boxes. Just don’t ever think a simple cardboard box is enough to ship your precious products in. For such an important task, you must always remember to turn to corrugated.

Extraordinary Gift Box Ideas

Gifts make people feel special.

They show you care. Perhaps that’s why the tradition of giving and receiving gifts has persisted throughout the ages.

The best gift boxes have the potential to make gift-giving magical. Filled with a collection of themed items, the perfect gift box can deliver more joy than the sum of each component.

In fact, some surveys suggest memorable gift boxes can strengthen relationships.

Maybe that’s because gift boxes demonstrate that you know and care about someone enough to find multiple items that speak to their personalities, interests, and needs.

Are you ready to make your favorite people feel special?

Send a gift box to make employees or friends feel appreciated, to celebrate their birthday, or even welcome them to a new home. Send a themed gift box for any event you want to acknowledge and celebrate in style.

Get started by finding all the best gift box ideas you need below.

What is it: A customizable box packed with drool-worthy snacks offered by BIPOC- and women-owned brands.

Why employees love this: They’ll love enjoying delicious snacks and also knowing that each box purchased supports a rotating list of philanthropic causes.

What is it: This work-enhancing home box features office decor, gadgets, and productivity aids that any goal-oriented friend or coworker will swoon over.

Why we love it: Re-energize and motivate your recipient(s) to stay focused and passionate. Plus, this box is great for onboarding new employees.

All you need to know about Paper Cup origins

The exact origins of the paper cup seem to be unknown, therefore the inventor of the handy disposable beverage holder may never be known, although there is evidence that they were used as far back as Imperial China. What is known is that around the beginning of the 1900’s, paper cups gained popularity when people began to realise that sharing the same tin or ladle, to drink from water barrels, also meant sharing germs.

Dixie printed paper cups are referenced as the "handy helpers like paper cups".

In 1907, a Boston lawyer named Lawrence Luellen, developed the “Health Kup” (which later became known as the Dixie Cup in 1919). Lawrence did this to help improve public health and hygiene due to the concerns of shared-use cups

But Lawrence didn’t perform this mammoth task alone. He worked for the American Water Supply Company, whose founder, Hugh Moore, developed a water-vending machine with disposable cups and together Lawrence and Hugh embarked on an advertising campaign to educate the public and market the machine.

During the great American flu epidemic of 1918 paper cups rapidly grew in popularity as a way of avoiding infection.

In the century since, the paper cup has evolved from simply a health solution to an everyday convenience object. Each day, millions of paper cups are used so that people can take their drinks with them whilst they go, something that is necessary in today’s busy world. Another great use of the paper cup is at large events, for example festivals and concerts due to the fact that they can just be recycled at the end of the day instead of 1000’s of cups having to be washed.


When Do Babies Need Shoes?

Tiny, name brand running sneakers. Sparkly dress-up flats. Wee jelly sandals and loafers…baby shoes are really, really cute. It’s almost impossible not to buy them all up! But just because they’re super-adorable, doesn’t necessarily mean your tot needs them. Worse, putting the wrong shoes on a budding walker may hinder their newfound skills. Here, we break down what your baby’s growing feet really need.

The short answer is no. Your baby does not need shoes until they start walking, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. The only thing younger babies need on their feet are socks to keep them warm.

Think about it like this: The purpose of shoes (other than to look cute, of course), is to protect the feet. But if your precious nugget is dangling from a baby carrier, relaxing in the stroller, or scooting on their hands and knees, there’s nothing to protect their feet from. If warmth is what you crave for your baby’s tootsies, cozy socks, footed snowsuits, and stroller sacks do the trick.

Beyond not needing shoes, putting shoes on babies who are just learning to balance on their growing feet can be a downright hindrance. Shoes with inflexible soles can prevent a baby from learning how to flex and move their feet to walk. That's why pediatricians recommend that babies learn to walk barefoot in a safe space, like on their living room floor. This’ll help strengthen the muscles and tendons in your baby’s feet.

There is no particular age at which your baby will need shoes, but a good rule of thumb is to wait until they’ve learned to walk and show signs of wanting to be up and about. The general milestone guideline for when a baby begins to walk is:

  • Between 6 and 13 months: crawling

  • Between 9 and 12 months: pulling themselves up

  • Between 8 and 18 months: walking

It is important to remember that not all babies are on the same trajectory. If your child’s progress doesn’t fit neatly in the above timeline, it doesn't necessarily mean something is wrong. Don’t hesitate to talk to your pediatrician about any concerns.

Why should people wear indoor shoes in the house?

Barefoot we pronate for a longer period of time which then alters the biomechanics and distribution of pressure and weight across the foot. This imbalance may increase the progression of underlying foot deformities such as bunions and hammertoes and lead to painful conditions associated with excessive pronation such as arch/ heel pain, shin splints/ posterior tibial tendonitis, and Achilles tendonitis. This imbalance can then translate upward affecting other parts of the body such as our knees and back.

I strongly advise against wearing outdoor shoes indoors to avoid the unnecessary and non hygienic transfer of soil, bacteria, viruses, and pollen from the environment into our homes. A study by Charles Gerba, a microbiologist and professor at the University of Arizona, and The Rockport Company found large numbers of bacteria both on the bottom and inside of shoes. Although some scientists suggest this concern is overblown, some of the bacteria found on the shoes such as E. Coli can cause intestinal and urinary tract infections, meningitis and diarrhea while other bacteria such as Klebsiella Pneumonia, can cause pneumonia as well as wound and bloodstream infections. A convenient new shoe that recently entered the market are Muvez shoes. Muvez shoes are indoor slippers with a detachable outdoor sneaker sole. These shoes would be a nice compromise for those that do not currently remove their outdoor shoes when at home. The outdoor sneaker sole easily comes off when you arrive at home turning into an indoor slipper and then quickly attaches when you leave to become an appropriate outdoor shoe.

Plantar Warts are easy to contract. A wart is a thickened and elevated small growth of skin that develops when the skin becomes infected by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts can develop anywhere on the foot, but typically occur in areas of direct pressure under the foot, such as the ball and the heel. Hard and thick callus can grow over the wart lesions as they grow inward and make them more painful. Clotted blood vessels or as they are commonly called "wart seeds" present as black dots at the base of the lesions. I know what you're thinking – I can catch this at home? Absolutely! If you're wearing outdoor shoes inside, you can bring a number of bacterial and fungal infections to yourself. You can catch the virus from a spouse or roommate if they have plantar warts. That's why I suggest having an indoor shoe specifically inside. Do not walk barefoot inside and do not wear outside shoes in doors.

Grid Cloth

Looking at the light source itself through the diffusion we can clearly see how a combination of direct light and diffuse light creates a harder source (as in the Spun and Opal options). As the definition of the original light source becomes increasingly obfuscated by the diffusion material, the overall size of the source increases and the quality of light is softened substantially.

The Tough Spun has very interesting properties. As it is a fine pattern of thin threads, there are clear spots along the material where direct light can shine through. This means that it produces a combination of both hard and diffuse light. You can see this illustrated in the images of the geometric shapes from our test, as both the umbra and penumbra of the shadows are well-defined.

“Tough Spun doesn’t really change the shadow transfer value [from that of a hard-light source],” notes Williams. “The shadows are still sharp, with just a reduction in contrast. All three of the Tough Spun strengths have this same behavior. This effect is clearest in the heaviest of the three, Full Tough Spun, where the penumbra has a clean, hard line, and the umbra of the shadow, although diminished, is still clearly defined. The Light Opal, on the other hand — as minimal an effect as it might have — starts to produce a breakdown in the definition of the penumbra, denoting more softness to the light.

“It was very interesting to me that the Tough Spun lent a texture to the light, a lot like a cookie or a celo cookie,” Williams continues. “It’s subtle, but it does project a pattern onto the subject.” As with any projected pattern, the farther away the pattern-producing material is from the light source, the better-defined the pattern will be on the subject.

The amount of diffusion increases with 1⁄4 216, which, we can see, produces very similar effects in terms of shadow quality to 1⁄2 216 and 1⁄4 Grid Cloth. Full Grid Cloth and 216 also produce very similar effects to one another, although Full Grid Cloth offers more diffusion of the light, as can be seen in the more diffuse penumbra; the definition of the shape is almost completely gone.

To further understand how diffusion works, we need to take a look at the material itself and see our light source behind it. The quality of light is created by the size of the light source relative to the subject, but if our diffusion material isn’t wholly opaque and we can still see some of the original source behind that material, then the actual fixture — in addition to the “new” light source created by the diffusion — has an effect on the overall quality of light. This is how lighter diffusions, even at the same size and placed at the same distance to the subject, create light that is less soft than what results from heavier diffusions — because they effectively combine the scattered light of the new apparent light source with the direct light of the original source, which is farther away and smaller.

Its very important to know how to choose fiberglass cloth

Polyester glass fiber cloth is a new kind of glass fiber composite anti crack material, which is composed of 60% glass fiber and 40% polyester fiber. This unique combination provides the strength of glass fiber and the flexibility of polyester fiber, but has no disadvantages of raw materials. Then, I will introduce the characteristics of fiberglass cloth for you to choose and identify.

Polyester fiberglass cloth is a kind of geotextile woven from high temperature resistant polyester filament or staple fiber, which is compounded with fiberglass grid or warp knitted grid.

Glass fiber cloth will have a lot of small broken fibers, which will swell up when pricked on the body. The proportion of glass fiber is generally 2.6, which should be heavier. In other words, the handle of glass fiber cloth will be harder, especially the glass fiber of tank kiln. It can be seen that both ends of the broken end roll of alkali free glass cloth are light blue-green. The heat conduction speed of glass fiber should be faster than that of chemical fiber Fiber cloth is not as dense as ordinary fiber, and looks loose.

Glass fiber grid has no water-proof function, its grid can form the inlay and extrusion effect with asphalt mixture, but it is difficult to fix in use, easy to expand and not fit, and even affects the normal paving and reinforcement effect of asphalt mixture; geotextile can prevent underwater seepage, but when the paving temperature of hot asphalt mixture exceeds 160 ℃, the strength and creep resistance of geotextile are poor, so it can not play the role of reinforcement Anti cracking effect of reinforcement.

Polyester fiberglass cloth overcomes the shortcomings of the two, and can be recycled after crushing. When milling, it will be crushed into very small fibers to improve the performance of rap.

In the process of urban road construction, it is necessary to deal with the joint of new and old roads, the transverse crack of semi-rigid water stable base, the white to black cement concrete pavement, to prevent the reflection crack of cement concrete pavement, all of which need to use polyester glass fiber cloth to ensure the project quality.

Polyester fiberglass cloth combines the characteristics of both, customer service on the shortcomings of the positive development and design, this product can meet the strict requirements of the project.

High-Performance Fiber Technology

High-performance fibers are those that are engineered for specific uses that require exceptional strength, stiffness, heat resistance, or chemical resistance. There exist a wide variety of fibers with widely ranging properties.

Carbon fiber is one of the most important high-performance fibers for military and aerospace applications. Carbon fiber is engineered for strength and stiffness, but variations differ in electrical conductivity, thermal, and chemical properties. The primary factors governing the physical properties are the degree of carbonization (or the carbon content, usually greater than 92 percent by weight), the orientation of the layered carbon planes, and the degree of crystallization.

Commercial carbon fibers are made by extrusion of some organic precursor material into filaments, followed by a carbonization process to convert the filaments into carbon. Different precursors and carbonization processes are used depending on the desired product properties. Precursor fibers can be specially purified rayon, pitch, or acrylics. The precursor fiber may also be converted into fabric form, which is then carbonized to produce the end product.

High-performance organic fibers have also become very important in recent years. Aramids are among the best known of the high-performance, synthetic, organic fibers. Closely related to the nylons, aramids are polyamides derived from aromatic acids and amines. Because of the stability of the aromatic rings and the added strength of the amide linkages, aramids exhibit higher tensile strength and thermal resistance than the aliphatic polyamides (nylons). The para-aramids (p-aramids, based on terephthalic acid and p-phenylenediamine, or p-aminobenzoic acid, exhibit higher strength and thermal resistance than those with linkages in the meta positions of the benzene ring. The greater degree of conjugation and more linear geometry of the para linkages, combined with the greater chain orientation derived from this linearity, are primarily responsible for the increased strength. The high impact resistance of the para-aramids makes them popular for “bullet-proof” body armor. For many less demanding applications, aramids may be blended with other fibers.

Lightweight mesh

Lightweight meshes (LWM) have shown benefits compared to heavyweight meshes (HWM) in terms of less postoperative pain and stiffness in open inguinal hernia repair. It appears to have similar advantages also in TEP, but concerns exist if it may be associated with higher recurrence rates. The aim of the study was to compare reoperation rate for recurrence of LWM to HWM in laparoscopic totally extra-peritoneal (TEP) repair.

Methods

All groin hernias operated on with TEP between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2013 at surgical units participating in The Swedish Hernia Register were eligible. Data included clinically important hernia variables. Primary endpoint was reoperation for recurrence. Median follow-up time was 6.1 years (0–11.5) with minimum 2.5 years postoperatively.

Results

In total, 13,839 repairs were included for statistical analysis and 491 were re-operated for recurrence. Multivariate analysis demonstrated significantly increased risk of reoperation for recurrence in LWM 4.0% (HR 1.56, P < 0.001) compared to HWM 3.2%. This was most evident in direct hernias (HR 1.75, P < 0.001) and in hernia repairs with a defect > 3 cm (HR 1.54, P < 0.021). The risk of recurrence with use of LWM in indirect hernias and in hernia repairs with a defect < 1.5 cm was more comparable to HWM.

Conclusions

Lightweight meshes were associated with an increased risk of reoperation for recurrence compared to HWM. While direct hernias and larger hernia defects may benefit from HWM to avoid increased recurrence rates, LWM is recommended to be used in indirect and smaller hernia defects in TEP repair.

How to Work with Fiberglass Tape

Fiberglass mesh tape is easier to use than paper tape. Paper tape needs to be pressed into a layer of compound and the excess compound removed. The trick is that you must remove surplus compound without wrinkling the tape or removing so much that the tape buckles because you've created dry spots. Faced with all of those paper tape challenges, you'll probably agree that fiberglass tape is worth its extra cost.

When you buy fiberglass tape, ensure that the package indicates it's self-adhesive. While the nonadhesive version is scarce, getting a roll could be an unpleasant surprise.

Be sure you keep a sharp utility knife blade available to cut fiberglass tape. A dull blade will merely skip over the fabric or snag the threads. If you're tackling a big project, consider getting a tape dispenser. It's a speedy helper for both flat seams and inside corners.


What steps should I take while checking my blood pressure at home?

Before taking your blood pressure

  • Find a quiet place.

  • Check to be sure you have the correct size cuff. If you are not sure, or if you have questions, talk to your healthcare provider. (Avoid wrist and finger monitors to ensure an accurate blood pressure reading.)

  • Roll up the sleeve on your left arm or remove any tight-sleeved clothing, if needed. (It's best to take your blood pressure from your left arm if you are right-handed. However, you can use the other arm if you have been told to do so by your healthcare provider.)

  • Rest in a chair next to a table for 5 to 10 minutes. (Your left arm should rest comfortably at heart level.)

  • Sit up straight with your back against the chair, legs uncrossed and on the ground.

  • Rest your forearm on the table with the palm of your hand facing up.

  • You should not talk, read the newspaper, or watch television during this process.

Taking your blood pressure

If you buy a manual or digital blood pressure monitor (sphygmomanometer), follow the instruction booklet carefully.

Record your blood pressure

If you have been asked to record your blood pressure and bring your readings to the office, please write down the date, time of day, systolic and diastolic numbers, heart rate, and which arm you took the reading on. If you are taking part in a program that has remote monitoring, your blood pressure readings are automatically shared with your medical provider. If you are unsure, please ask your provider.

Pulse Oximeter Accuracy

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused an increase in the use of pulse oximeters, and a recent report (Sjoding et al.External Link Disclaimer) suggests that the devices may be less accurate in people with dark skin pigmentation. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is informing patients and health care providers that although pulse oximetry is useful for estimating blood oxygen levels, pulse oximeters have limitations and a risk of inaccuracy under certain circumstances that should be considered. Patients with conditions such as COVID-19 who monitor their condition at home should pay attention to all signs and symptoms of their condition and communicate any concerns to their health care provider.

How to take a reading:

  • Follow your health care provider’s recommendations about when and how often to check your oxygen levels.

  • Be aware that multiple factors can affect the accuracy of a pulse oximeter reading, such as poor circulation, skin pigmentation, skin thickness, skin temperature, current tobacco use, and use of fingernail polish. To get the best reading from a pulse oximeter:

    • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use.

    • When placing the oximeter on your finger, make sure your hand is warm, relaxed, and held below the level of the heart. Remove any fingernail polish on that finger.

    • Sit still and do not move the part of your body where the pulse oximeter is located.

    • Wait a few seconds until the reading stops changing and displays one steady number.

  • Write down your oxygen levels with the date and time of the reading so you can easily track changes and report these to your health care provider.

How to interpret a reading:

  • When taking pulse oximeter measurements, pay attention to whether the oxygen level is lower than earlier measurements, or is decreasing over time. Changes or trends in measurements may be more meaningful than one single measurement. Over the counter products that you can buy at the store or online are not intended for medical purposes.

  • Do not rely only on a pulse oximeter to assess your health condition or oxygen level.

  • If monitoring oxygen levels at home, pay attention to other signs or symptoms of low oxygen levels, such as:

    • Bluish coloring in the face, lips, or nails;

    • Shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, or a cough that gets worse;

    • Restlessness and discomfort;

    • Chest pain or tightness; and

    • Fast or racing pulse rate.

    • Be aware that some patients with low oxygen levels may not show any or all of these symptoms. Only a health care provider can diagnose a medical condition such as hypoxia (low oxygen levels).

When to contact your health care provider:

  • If you are concerned about the pulse oximeter reading, or if your symptoms are serious or getting worse, contact a health care provider.

  • If you think you may have COVID-19, contact your health care provider or local health department about getting a diagnostic test for COVID-19. Pulse oximeters cannot be used to diagnose or rule out COVID-19.

What You Need to Know About Using a Fetal Doppler at Home

You’re pregnant and you know it can be an exciting, beautiful experience. But you’re also a little nervous. You want some reassurance that everything is A-OK. Wouldn’t it be great if I could check on my little one right now? you find yourself thinking.

Or maybe you’re not so nervous as you are wanting to bond with your baby a little more — looking for a way to connect.

First, rest assured that you’re not alone in your concerns. Many people are anxious for peace of mind or eager to bond with baby — which is why at-home fetal dopplers are so popular.

A fetal doppler — whether at the doctor’s office or purchased for home use — is a hand-held ultrasound device that uses soundwaves to listen to a fetal heartbeat. When you go to your doctor for a check-up, they’ll use one of these devices — hopefully, not without warming the ultrasound gel first! — to detect your baby’s heartbeat from around 8 to 10 weeks.

If your doctor can’t hear a heartbeat in the first trimester, it’s not necessarily a cause for concern. Some dopplers (yes, even those you encounter at your OB’s office!) only detect it after about 12 weeks.

For many, hearing the heartbeat at the doctor’s office is a magical, joyful, and reassuring experience — and the time between appointments is just so darn long to wait to hear that sweet sound again! The idea of listening to the heartbeat in between doctor’s appointments is appealing. It may also ease anxiety and help you feel more connected to your baby.

So what’s the harm? Well, possibly very little.

But not so fast. It’s important to know about the safety hazards of at-home fetal dopplers before you use one.

What is a nebulizer?

nebulizer is a small machine that creates a mist out of liquid medication, allowing for quicker and easier absorption of medication into the lungs.

Typically, nebulizers come in both electric or battery-run versions, and are either portable (so you can carry with you) or meant to sit on a table and plug into a wall.

Both versions of nebulizers are made up of:

  • a base that holds an air compressor

  • a small container for liquid medication

  • a tube that connects the air compressor to the medication container

Above the medication container is a mouthpiece or mask you use to inhale the mist.

A nebulizer is helpful for a variety of conditions, including:

  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

  • asthma

  • bronchiectasis

  • cystic fibrosis

  • pulmonary fibrosis

Nebulizers are also a helpful way to deliver medication during palliative care and to very young children.

Blood glucose meter: How to choose

If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level.

Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy.

Choosing the right meter

When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then with a special needle, you poke a clean fingertip to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen.

When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter:

  • Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed.

  • Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of the test strips, as these will represent the majority of the cost in the long term.

  • Ease of use. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How easy is it to get blood onto the strips? How much blood is required?

  • Special features. Ask about the features to see what meets your specific needs. Special features may include large, easy-to-handle buttons and test strips, illuminated screens, and audio, which may be useful for people with impaired vision.

  • Information storage and retrieval. Consider how the meter stores and retrieves information. Some can track time and date of a test, the result, and trends over time. Some meters offer the ability to share your readings in real time with your healthcare provider with a smartphone app. Or some may offer the option to download your blood glucose readings to a computer, then email the test results to your doctor.

  • Support. Most meter manufacturers include a toll-free number that you can call for help. Look for a meter that includes clear instructions that demonstrate the correct way to use the meter. Some manufacturers offer users manuals on their websites.


Things to Consider in Selecting Wire Rope Slings

This blog post is part of a new feature on AWRF where our members provide valuable insight into the industry.

Mishandling of workplace materials is the single largest cause of accidents in the workplace. Fortunately, most of these accidents are avoidable. With wire rope slings playing an important role with cranes, derricks, and hoists, it’s important to understand how to make a proper selection.

A wire rope sling is made of wire rope. It is composed of single wires that have been twisted into strands. These strands are then twisted to form a wire rope.

Here are 4 important characteristics to keep in mind when selecting a wire rope sling

1. Strength

The strength of a wire rope sling is a function of size, grade, and construction. It needs to accommodate the applied maximum load. The more a sling is used, both the design and the sling’s strength are reduced. A sling loaded beyond it strength will fail. For older slings it’s important to inspect often.

2. Fatigue

Wire rope slings must be able to take repeated bending without wires failing due to fatigue, sometimes called bending without failure. The best way to preventing fatigue failure is to use blocking or padding to increase the radius of bend.

3. Abrasive Wear

The ability of wire rope to withstand abrasion. It’s determined by size, number of wires, and construction of the rope. Remember that smaller wires bend easier and offer greater flexibility, which also means they are more susceptible to abrasion.

4. Abuse

The misuse of a wire rope will cause the sling to be unsafe well before any other reason. Kinking or bird caging will reduce the strength of a wire rope. Bird caging is forcibly untwisting the wire rope strands and they become spread outward. Be sure to keep up proper use per the manufacturer specifications.

These are just four factors to consider when determining the best wire rope slings for your application. Keep in mind that weight, size, flexibility, and shape of the loads being handled will also affect the life of a wire rope sling.

Common Wire Rope Fittings You Need To Know

Wire Rope Fittings
Wire rope can be prone to fray easily at the ends making it difficult to connect to equipment. Wire rope fittings or wire rope terminations are used to secure the ends of wire rope and prevent fraying. There are many different types, sizes and finishes of wire rope fittings which are suitable for most types of rope. Some of the more common types of wire rope fittings are detailed below.

Wire Rope Thimbles
A wire rope thimble is used in wire rope assemblies to prevent the wire rope eye from being crushed and reducing wear on the rope itself. When a wire rope assembly is fitted with an eye at the end, a thimble is inserted to form the eye of the loop before the rope is secured in the ferrule or wire rope grip.

Wire Rope Grips

A wire rope grip is used to clamp the loose end of a wire rope after it has been looped back to form an eye. Wire rope assemblies generally require a minimum of three wire rope grips, depending on the wire and application to properly secure the ends.

Wire Rope Ferrules
Wire rope ferrules are used to terminate wire rope ends. Oval shaped sleeves are crushed around the wire rope to form eyes or to create a stopper on the end of a wire rope assembly. This can be done either by hand tools or via a hydraulic press. Hand pressing ferrules is only recommended on smaller diameters of wire ropes.

Turnbuckles/Rigging screws

These are wire rope fittings that are attached to wire rope assemblies and can be used to adjust the tension of wire rope. Turnbuckles typically consist of two eye bolts, one at each end of a metal frame. The tension of the wire rope can then be adjusted by rotating the frame.

Wire Rope Sockets

A wire rope socket is permanently attached using a hydraulic press to fit it to the end of the wire rope. These can be used instead of thimbles, wire rope grips or ferrules. Please don’t try this one at home, it takes specialised tools and knowledge to fit these to wire ropes.

Steel Wire Rope

Steel wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix forming a composite “rope”, in a pattern known as “laid rope”. Larger diameter wire rope consists of multiple strands of such laid rope in a pattern known as “cable laid”.

In stricter senses the term “steel wire rope” refers to diameter larger than 3/8 inch (9.52 mm), with smaller gauges designated cable or cords. Initially wrought iron wires were used, but today steel is the main material used for wire ropes.

Wire Rope Inspections EN

Historically, steel wire rope evolved from wrought iron chains, which had a record of mechanical failure. While flaws in chain links or solid steel bars can lead to catastrophic failure, flaws in the wires making up a steel cable are less critical as the other wires easily take up the load. While friction between the individual wires and strands causes wear over the life of the rope, it also helps to compensate for minor failures in the short run.

Steel wire ropes were developed starting with mining hoist applications in the 1830s. Wire ropes are used dynamically for lifting and hoisting in cranes and elevators, and for transmission of mechanical power. Wire rope is also used to transmit force in mechanisms, such as a Bowden cable or the control surfaces of an airplane connected to levers and pedals in the cockpit. Only aircraft cables have WSC (wire strand core). Also, aircraft cables are available in smaller diameters than steel wire rope. For example, aircraft cables are available in 3/64 in. diameter while most wire ropes begin at a 1/4 in. diameter. Static wire ropes are used to support structures such as suspension bridges or as guy wires to support towers. An aerial tramway relies on wire rope to support and move cargo overhead.

Why Choose Dyneema Rope Vs Steel Wire Rope For Heavy-Duty Rigging?

Manufacturing companies choose to use Dyneema rope over steel wire rope for heavy lifting applications such as heavy lift slings, crane rope, and other rigging operations because Dyneema rope:

  • Is 15x stronger than steel wire rope

  • Has a recoil force that is considerably less than steel wire rope

  • Has an abrasion lifetime that is 4x longer than steel wire rope

  • Is 7x lighter than steel wire rope at the same strength

Dyneema fiber rope is made from Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber. Dyneema 12 strand rope is a common Dyneema fibered rope used for heavy-duty rigging applications. USA Rope & Recovery manufactures several different types of Dyneema fiber rope including the popular 12 Strand, and 24 Strand ropes, as well as others. No matter the application, USA Rope provides strong, durable, and efficient rope for the marine, arborist, nautical, off-roading, and other manufacturing industries.

More times than not, Dyneema fiber rope and steel wire rope are compared by most manufacturing companies–like The Rigging Company –for certain maritime, mooring, and towing rope applications. Pound for pound, Dyneema fiber rope is up to 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than aramid fibers–otherwise known as Kevlar rope. The high-performance strength and low weight of Dyneema rope ensures that it is safer to use than steel wire rope. Ideally, Manufacturing companies want a rope that can withstand tremendous weight while being light enough to move, use, and work with when needed. Traditionally, steel wire rope is used for heavy-duty maritime, rigging, and mooring rope applications. Although steel wire rope is known for being used for heavy-duty rigging, the disadvantage is the serious risks that come from its heavy-weight and uneven breakage behavior. When a steel wire rope breaks, the combination of the enormous energy and incredible force causes unpredictable recoil. This unpredictable recoil comes from how wire rope is coiled. Essentially, wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix, forming a composite rope. When breakage occurs, the helix formed rope unravels, creating a snaking behavior which can cause sharp edges of the broken strands to release at a dangerous force. The lack of strength compared to Dyneema rope shows that steel wire rope is more susceptible to breaking. This can increase risk factors for manufacturing companies that use steel wire rope for rigging, mooring, and heavy duty lifting.

For example, when comparing a ⅜ inch 12 Strand Dyneema rope to a ⅜ inch steel wire rope, the 12 strand Dyneema rope is significantly stronger and presents safer breaking characteristics. The ⅜ inch steel wire rope withstands a load of 14,478 pounds. As the video shows, even in the event of a partial rupture, the steel wire ropes higher mass and recoil provides a greater risk over 12 Strand Dyneema rope. With a ⅜ inch 12 Strand Dyneema rope, it can withstand 18,857 pounds. With the Dyneema fibers low mass and recoil, it reduces the risks for manufacturing companies using rigging rope for heavy-duty lifting applications.

Types of Coated Wire Rope

PVC-coated wire rope, nylon-coated wire rope, or no coating at all? Unsure about which of these is appropriate for your application? Read on and find out.

Coated wire rope has a plastic or nylon coating which enhances the rope’s resistance to both corrosion and wear-and-tear. It also provides a soft protective shield for stainless steel and galvanized wire ropes. Nylon is hard wearing, that is, very abrasion resistant and mostly immune to peeling.

COATED WIRE COLOURS

Manufacturers produce coated wire rope in a variety of colours but the most popular being white, black, and clear. Perhaps due to practical aesthetics, neutral colours blend more easily into the background. Coated wires can appear invisible or non-existent from a reasonable distance, making it popular choice for rigging and suspension applications in many industries.

COATED WIRE APPLICATIONS

Both PVC coated wire and nylon coated wire are used in a wide range of applications. Both are best suited if you require a protective layer for

  • shielding goods,

  • running quietly over a pulleyor

  • where protection from injury is required for animals or humans

Plastic coated wire is best for a variety of aquaculture, farming, agriculture, animal husbandry, public stadiums, and zoos. Nylon coated wire is ideal for pulley applications that require silent operation.

WHICH INDUSTRIES USE COATED WIRE ROPE?

  • Transport industry uses coated wire rope in slings and strops for unloading cargo.

  • Health clubs and gyms use coated wires on the adjustable pulleys of gym equipment.

  • Theatre productions utilize coated wires for pulling up or lowering down props, and for rigging theatre lighting.The event hire industry use coated wire for rigging marquees and stages

  • In construction sites and similar height safety and restraint applications, coated wire is used for lanyards restraint cables


Things to Consider in Selecting Wire Rope Slings

This blog post is part of a new feature on AWRF where our members provide valuable insight into the industry.

Mishandling of workplace materials is the single largest cause of accidents in the workplace. Fortunately, most of these accidents are avoidable. With wire rope slings playing an important role with cranes, derricks, and hoists, it’s important to understand how to make a proper selection.

A wire rope sling is made of wire rope. It is composed of single wires that have been twisted into strands. These strands are then twisted to form a wire rope.

Here are 4 important characteristics to keep in mind when selecting a wire rope sling

1. Strength

The strength of a wire rope sling is a function of size, grade, and construction. It needs to accommodate the applied maximum load. The more a sling is used, both the design and the sling’s strength are reduced. A sling loaded beyond it strength will fail. For older slings it’s important to inspect often.

2. Fatigue

Wire rope slings must be able to take repeated bending without wires failing due to fatigue, sometimes called bending without failure. The best way to preventing fatigue failure is to use blocking or padding to increase the radius of bend.

3. Abrasive Wear

The ability of wire rope to withstand abrasion. It’s determined by size, number of wires, and construction of the rope. Remember that smaller wires bend easier and offer greater flexibility, which also means they are more susceptible to abrasion.

4. Abuse

The misuse of a wire rope will cause the sling to be unsafe well before any other reason. Kinking or bird caging will reduce the strength of a wire rope. Bird caging is forcibly untwisting the wire rope strands and they become spread outward. Be sure to keep up proper use per the manufacturer specifications.

These are just four factors to consider when determining the best wire rope slings for your application. Keep in mind that weight, size, flexibility, and shape of the loads being handled will also affect the life of a wire rope sling.

Common Wire Rope Fittings You Need To Know

Wire Rope Fittings
Wire rope can be prone to fray easily at the ends making it difficult to connect to equipment. Wire rope fittings or wire rope terminations are used to secure the ends of wire rope and prevent fraying. There are many different types, sizes and finishes of wire rope fittings which are suitable for most types of rope. Some of the more common types of wire rope fittings are detailed below.

Wire Rope Thimbles
A wire rope thimble is used in wire rope assemblies to prevent the wire rope eye from being crushed and reducing wear on the rope itself. When a wire rope assembly is fitted with an eye at the end, a thimble is inserted to form the eye of the loop before the rope is secured in the ferrule or wire rope grip.

Wire Rope Grips

A wire rope grip is used to clamp the loose end of a wire rope after it has been looped back to form an eye. Wire rope assemblies generally require a minimum of three wire rope grips, depending on the wire and application to properly secure the ends.

Wire Rope Ferrules
Wire rope ferrules are used to terminate wire rope ends. Oval shaped sleeves are crushed around the wire rope to form eyes or to create a stopper on the end of a wire rope assembly. This can be done either by hand tools or via a hydraulic press. Hand pressing ferrules is only recommended on smaller diameters of wire ropes.

Turnbuckles/Rigging screws

These are wire rope fittings that are attached to wire rope assemblies and can be used to adjust the tension of wire rope. Turnbuckles typically consist of two eye bolts, one at each end of a metal frame. The tension of the wire rope can then be adjusted by rotating the frame.

Wire Rope Sockets

A wire rope socket is permanently attached using a hydraulic press to fit it to the end of the wire rope. These can be used instead of thimbles, wire rope grips or ferrules. Please don’t try this one at home, it takes specialised tools and knowledge to fit these to wire ropes.

Steel Wire Rope

Steel wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix forming a composite “rope”, in a pattern known as “laid rope”. Larger diameter wire rope consists of multiple strands of such laid rope in a pattern known as “cable laid”.

In stricter senses the term “steel wire rope” refers to diameter larger than 3/8 inch (9.52 mm), with smaller gauges designated cable or cords. Initially wrought iron wires were used, but today steel is the main material used for wire ropes.

Wire Rope Inspections EN

Historically, steel wire rope evolved from wrought iron chains, which had a record of mechanical failure. While flaws in chain links or solid steel bars can lead to catastrophic failure, flaws in the wires making up a steel cable are less critical as the other wires easily take up the load. While friction between the individual wires and strands causes wear over the life of the rope, it also helps to compensate for minor failures in the short run.

Steel wire ropes were developed starting with mining hoist applications in the 1830s. Wire ropes are used dynamically for lifting and hoisting in cranes and elevators, and for transmission of mechanical power. Wire rope is also used to transmit force in mechanisms, such as a Bowden cable or the control surfaces of an airplane connected to levers and pedals in the cockpit. Only aircraft cables have WSC (wire strand core). Also, aircraft cables are available in smaller diameters than steel wire rope. For example, aircraft cables are available in 3/64 in. diameter while most wire ropes begin at a 1/4 in. diameter. Static wire ropes are used to support structures such as suspension bridges or as guy wires to support towers. An aerial tramway relies on wire rope to support and move cargo overhead.

Why Choose Dyneema Rope Vs Steel Wire Rope For Heavy-Duty Rigging?

Manufacturing companies choose to use Dyneema rope over steel wire rope for heavy lifting applications such as heavy lift slings, crane rope, and other rigging operations because Dyneema rope:

  • Is 15x stronger than steel wire rope

  • Has a recoil force that is considerably less than steel wire rope

  • Has an abrasion lifetime that is 4x longer than steel wire rope

  • Is 7x lighter than steel wire rope at the same strength

Dyneema fiber rope is made from Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber. Dyneema 12 strand rope is a common Dyneema fibered rope used for heavy-duty rigging applications. USA Rope & Recovery manufactures several different types of Dyneema fiber rope including the popular 12 Strand, and 24 Strand ropes, as well as others. No matter the application, USA Rope provides strong, durable, and efficient rope for the marine, arborist, nautical, off-roading, and other manufacturing industries.

More times than not, Dyneema fiber rope and steel wire rope are compared by most manufacturing companies–like The Rigging Company –for certain maritime, mooring, and towing rope applications. Pound for pound, Dyneema fiber rope is up to 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than aramid fibers–otherwise known as Kevlar rope. The high-performance strength and low weight of Dyneema rope ensures that it is safer to use than steel wire rope. Ideally, Manufacturing companies want a rope that can withstand tremendous weight while being light enough to move, use, and work with when needed. Traditionally, steel wire rope is used for heavy-duty maritime, rigging, and mooring rope applications. Although steel wire rope is known for being used for heavy-duty rigging, the disadvantage is the serious risks that come from its heavy-weight and uneven breakage behavior. When a steel wire rope breaks, the combination of the enormous energy and incredible force causes unpredictable recoil. This unpredictable recoil comes from how wire rope is coiled. Essentially, wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix, forming a composite rope. When breakage occurs, the helix formed rope unravels, creating a snaking behavior which can cause sharp edges of the broken strands to release at a dangerous force. The lack of strength compared to Dyneema rope shows that steel wire rope is more susceptible to breaking. This can increase risk factors for manufacturing companies that use steel wire rope for rigging, mooring, and heavy duty lifting.

For example, when comparing a ⅜ inch 12 Strand Dyneema rope to a ⅜ inch steel wire rope, the 12 strand Dyneema rope is significantly stronger and presents safer breaking characteristics. The ⅜ inch steel wire rope withstands a load of 14,478 pounds. As the video shows, even in the event of a partial rupture, the steel wire ropes higher mass and recoil provides a greater risk over 12 Strand Dyneema rope. With a ⅜ inch 12 Strand Dyneema rope, it can withstand 18,857 pounds. With the Dyneema fibers low mass and recoil, it reduces the risks for manufacturing companies using rigging rope for heavy-duty lifting applications.

Types of Coated Wire Rope

PVC-coated wire rope, nylon-coated wire rope, or no coating at all? Unsure about which of these is appropriate for your application? Read on and find out.

Coated wire rope has a plastic or nylon coating which enhances the rope’s resistance to both corrosion and wear-and-tear. It also provides a soft protective shield for stainless steel and galvanized wire ropes. Nylon is hard wearing, that is, very abrasion resistant and mostly immune to peeling.

COATED WIRE COLOURS

Manufacturers produce coated wire rope in a variety of colours but the most popular being white, black, and clear. Perhaps due to practical aesthetics, neutral colours blend more easily into the background. Coated wires can appear invisible or non-existent from a reasonable distance, making it popular choice for rigging and suspension applications in many industries.

COATED WIRE APPLICATIONS

Both PVC coated wire and nylon coated wire are used in a wide range of applications. Both are best suited if you require a protective layer for

  • shielding goods,

  • running quietly over a pulleyor

  • where protection from injury is required for animals or humans

Plastic coated wire is best for a variety of aquaculture, farming, agriculture, animal husbandry, public stadiums, and zoos. Nylon coated wire is ideal for pulley applications that require silent operation.

WHICH INDUSTRIES USE COATED WIRE ROPE?

  • Transport industry uses coated wire rope in slings and strops for unloading cargo.

  • Health clubs and gyms use coated wires on the adjustable pulleys of gym equipment.

  • Theatre productions utilize coated wires for pulling up or lowering down props, and for rigging theatre lighting.The event hire industry use coated wire for rigging marquees and stages

  • In construction sites and similar height safety and restraint applications, coated wire is used for lanyards restraint cables


Things to Consider in Selecting Wire Rope Slings

This blog post is part of a new feature on AWRF where our members provide valuable insight into the industry.

Mishandling of workplace materials is the single largest cause of accidents in the workplace. Fortunately, most of these accidents are avoidable. With wire rope slings playing an important role with cranes, derricks, and hoists, it’s important to understand how to make a proper selection.

A wire rope sling is made of wire rope. It is composed of single wires that have been twisted into strands. These strands are then twisted to form a wire rope.

Here are 4 important characteristics to keep in mind when selecting a wire rope sling

1. Strength

The strength of a wire rope sling is a function of size, grade, and construction. It needs to accommodate the applied maximum load. The more a sling is used, both the design and the sling’s strength are reduced. A sling loaded beyond it strength will fail. For older slings it’s important to inspect often.

2. Fatigue

Wire rope slings must be able to take repeated bending without wires failing due to fatigue, sometimes called bending without failure. The best way to preventing fatigue failure is to use blocking or padding to increase the radius of bend.

3. Abrasive Wear

The ability of wire rope to withstand abrasion. It’s determined by size, number of wires, and construction of the rope. Remember that smaller wires bend easier and offer greater flexibility, which also means they are more susceptible to abrasion.

4. Abuse

The misuse of a wire rope will cause the sling to be unsafe well before any other reason. Kinking or bird caging will reduce the strength of a wire rope. Bird caging is forcibly untwisting the wire rope strands and they become spread outward. Be sure to keep up proper use per the manufacturer specifications.

These are just four factors to consider when determining the best wire rope slings for your application. Keep in mind that weight, size, flexibility, and shape of the loads being handled will also affect the life of a wire rope sling.

Common Wire Rope Fittings You Need To Know

Wire Rope Fittings
Wire rope can be prone to fray easily at the ends making it difficult to connect to equipment. Wire rope fittings or wire rope terminations are used to secure the ends of wire rope and prevent fraying. There are many different types, sizes and finishes of wire rope fittings which are suitable for most types of rope. Some of the more common types of wire rope fittings are detailed below.

Wire Rope Thimbles
A wire rope thimble is used in wire rope assemblies to prevent the wire rope eye from being crushed and reducing wear on the rope itself. When a wire rope assembly is fitted with an eye at the end, a thimble is inserted to form the eye of the loop before the rope is secured in the ferrule or wire rope grip.

Wire Rope Grips

A wire rope grip is used to clamp the loose end of a wire rope after it has been looped back to form an eye. Wire rope assemblies generally require a minimum of three wire rope grips, depending on the wire and application to properly secure the ends.

Wire Rope Ferrules
Wire rope ferrules are used to terminate wire rope ends. Oval shaped sleeves are crushed around the wire rope to form eyes or to create a stopper on the end of a wire rope assembly. This can be done either by hand tools or via a hydraulic press. Hand pressing ferrules is only recommended on smaller diameters of wire ropes.

Turnbuckles/Rigging screws

These are wire rope fittings that are attached to wire rope assemblies and can be used to adjust the tension of wire rope. Turnbuckles typically consist of two eye bolts, one at each end of a metal frame. The tension of the wire rope can then be adjusted by rotating the frame.

Wire Rope Sockets

A wire rope socket is permanently attached using a hydraulic press to fit it to the end of the wire rope. These can be used instead of thimbles, wire rope grips or ferrules. Please don’t try this one at home, it takes specialised tools and knowledge to fit these to wire ropes.

Steel Wire Rope

Steel wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix forming a composite “rope”, in a pattern known as “laid rope”. Larger diameter wire rope consists of multiple strands of such laid rope in a pattern known as “cable laid”.

In stricter senses the term “steel wire rope” refers to diameter larger than 3/8 inch (9.52 mm), with smaller gauges designated cable or cords. Initially wrought iron wires were used, but today steel is the main material used for wire ropes.

Wire Rope Inspections EN

Historically, steel wire rope evolved from wrought iron chains, which had a record of mechanical failure. While flaws in chain links or solid steel bars can lead to catastrophic failure, flaws in the wires making up a steel cable are less critical as the other wires easily take up the load. While friction between the individual wires and strands causes wear over the life of the rope, it also helps to compensate for minor failures in the short run.

Steel wire ropes were developed starting with mining hoist applications in the 1830s. Wire ropes are used dynamically for lifting and hoisting in cranes and elevators, and for transmission of mechanical power. Wire rope is also used to transmit force in mechanisms, such as a Bowden cable or the control surfaces of an airplane connected to levers and pedals in the cockpit. Only aircraft cables have WSC (wire strand core). Also, aircraft cables are available in smaller diameters than steel wire rope. For example, aircraft cables are available in 3/64 in. diameter while most wire ropes begin at a 1/4 in. diameter. Static wire ropes are used to support structures such as suspension bridges or as guy wires to support towers. An aerial tramway relies on wire rope to support and move cargo overhead.

Why Choose Dyneema Rope Vs Steel Wire Rope For Heavy-Duty Rigging?

Manufacturing companies choose to use Dyneema rope over steel wire rope for heavy lifting applications such as heavy lift slings, crane rope, and other rigging operations because Dyneema rope:

  • Is 15x stronger than steel wire rope

  • Has a recoil force that is considerably less than steel wire rope

  • Has an abrasion lifetime that is 4x longer than steel wire rope

  • Is 7x lighter than steel wire rope at the same strength

Dyneema fiber rope is made from Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) fiber. Dyneema 12 strand rope is a common Dyneema fibered rope used for heavy-duty rigging applications. USA Rope & Recovery manufactures several different types of Dyneema fiber rope including the popular 12 Strand, and 24 Strand ropes, as well as others. No matter the application, USA Rope provides strong, durable, and efficient rope for the marine, arborist, nautical, off-roading, and other manufacturing industries.

More times than not, Dyneema fiber rope and steel wire rope are compared by most manufacturing companies–like The Rigging Company –for certain maritime, mooring, and towing rope applications. Pound for pound, Dyneema fiber rope is up to 15 times stronger than steel and up to 40% stronger than aramid fibers–otherwise known as Kevlar rope. The high-performance strength and low weight of Dyneema rope ensures that it is safer to use than steel wire rope. Ideally, Manufacturing companies want a rope that can withstand tremendous weight while being light enough to move, use, and work with when needed. Traditionally, steel wire rope is used for heavy-duty maritime, rigging, and mooring rope applications. Although steel wire rope is known for being used for heavy-duty rigging, the disadvantage is the serious risks that come from its heavy-weight and uneven breakage behavior. When a steel wire rope breaks, the combination of the enormous energy and incredible force causes unpredictable recoil. This unpredictable recoil comes from how wire rope is coiled. Essentially, wire rope is several strands of metal wire twisted into a helix, forming a composite rope. When breakage occurs, the helix formed rope unravels, creating a snaking behavior which can cause sharp edges of the broken strands to release at a dangerous force. The lack of strength compared to Dyneema rope shows that steel wire rope is more susceptible to breaking. This can increase risk factors for manufacturing companies that use steel wire rope for rigging, mooring, and heavy duty lifting.

For example, when comparing a ⅜ inch 12 Strand Dyneema rope to a ⅜ inch steel wire rope, the 12 strand Dyneema rope is significantly stronger and presents safer breaking characteristics. The ⅜ inch steel wire rope withstands a load of 14,478 pounds. As the video shows, even in the event of a partial rupture, the steel wire ropes higher mass and recoil provides a greater risk over 12 Strand Dyneema rope. With a ⅜ inch 12 Strand Dyneema rope, it can withstand 18,857 pounds. With the Dyneema fibers low mass and recoil, it reduces the risks for manufacturing companies using rigging rope for heavy-duty lifting applications.

Types of Coated Wire Rope

PVC-coated wire rope, nylon-coated wire rope, or no coating at all? Unsure about which of these is appropriate for your application? Read on and find out.

Coated wire rope has a plastic or nylon coating which enhances the rope’s resistance to both corrosion and wear-and-tear. It also provides a soft protective shield for stainless steel and galvanized wire ropes. Nylon is hard wearing, that is, very abrasion resistant and mostly immune to peeling.

COATED WIRE COLOURS

Manufacturers produce coated wire rope in a variety of colours but the most popular being white, black, and clear. Perhaps due to practical aesthetics, neutral colours blend more easily into the background. Coated wires can appear invisible or non-existent from a reasonable distance, making it popular choice for rigging and suspension applications in many industries.

COATED WIRE APPLICATIONS

Both PVC coated wire and nylon coated wire are used in a wide range of applications. Both are best suited if you require a protective layer for

  • shielding goods,

  • running quietly over a pulleyor

  • where protection from injury is required for animals or humans

Plastic coated wire is best for a variety of aquaculture, farming, agriculture, animal husbandry, public stadiums, and zoos. Nylon coated wire is ideal for pulley applications that require silent operation.

WHICH INDUSTRIES USE COATED WIRE ROPE?

  • Transport industry uses coated wire rope in slings and strops for unloading cargo.

  • Health clubs and gyms use coated wires on the adjustable pulleys of gym equipment.

  • Theatre productions utilize coated wires for pulling up or lowering down props, and for rigging theatre lighting.The event hire industry use coated wire for rigging marquees and stages

  • In construction sites and similar height safety and restraint applications, coated wire is used for lanyards restraint cables


Why You Should Go for an Air Cooler Over an Air Conditioner?

In the ongoing debate of air conditioners vs air coolers, we list down few important pointers that will offer a clear idea of why you should opt for an air cooler.
But first things first, should you buy an air cooler?
A cooler can be used by everyone, especially people living around hot and dry weather. One can choose from a dessert cooler, a window cooler or even a personal cooler, depending on the requirements.

Read on to know more about why to choose an air cooler over an air conditioner.

Have you ever wondered about how an AC or an air cooler functions and how does it affect the quality of air in your home?

An air conditioner circulates the internal air of the room over and over again, whereas an air cooler pulls fresh air from outside and then cools it down. Also, air cooler doesn’t make the air overly dry like an air conditioner. Because of the way it operates, an air cooler offers better quality of air for your room. So much so, that the air circulated from an air cooler is preferable for people with asthma or dust allergy.

When it comes to value for money, an air cooler definitely scores high over an AC. Even though both end up cooling the room, an AC can cost anything ranging from ₹30,000 to ₹60,000, whereas a cooler will be available from ₹5000 to ₹15,000. Also, apart from the initial cost of purchasing, even the operating cost of an air cooler is less than an AC. You can approximately expect 80% less electricity bill from a cooler as compared to an AC, making it economical in the long run.

Going green is something that concerns all of us, and air coolers trumps the card here as well. Air conditioners use CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) and HFC (hydro-chlorofluorocarbons) as their refrigerant, which is quite harmful to the environment. On the other hand, air coolers are eco-friendlier, since they use water as the refrigerant.

Air cooler requires no installation, which is a cumbersome task in the case of an air conditioner. Whether you have a window AC or a split AC, they require additional arrangements for installation. An air cooler, on the other hand, can be simply moved into your home as an appliance. Many of the air coolers also come with castors, making it more convenient to move them around from one room to another. As you can see that air coolers definitely have their own place in the world. Especially, since they come with such a host of features like silent operation, remote control, multiple speed settings and more. Moreover, nowadays coolers are digitally enhanced and aesthetically pleasing to fit right in.

How Does an Electric Cool Box Work?

If you’re on the search for a camping fridge, you might want to consider a cool box. There are several options to choose from. But no matter your requirements, they keep the air in the interior cool to ensure that your drink and snacks stay refreshingly cold.

If you’re wondering how an electric cool box works, then learning about the technology behind them may make your decision easier. We have created this handy guide to answer some of your questions.

There are several reasons to purchase coolboxes, such as providing additional space for campers to store food on travels. But the main objective is to keep food and drink cold while they’re not stored in a fridge. Even without the need for ice, these electrical coolboxes will keep your food cold for the entire getaway. Whether you’re a first-time camper or wanting these products as a second fridge at home, a coolbox is a handy gadget to have.
Pros and Cons of Using Landscape Fabric

Whether you call it landscaping fabric, weed block or weed barrier fabric, ask any landscaper or gardener how they feel about its use and they’ll probably have a strong opinion.

Landscape fabric is often promoted as the solution to the bane of every gardener’s existence – weeds. Not only does it supposedly block unwanted weed growth, but best of all, you don’t have to worry about weeding for what seems like years.

Unfortunately, and like with many advertised products, this isn’t exactly true.

Landscaping fabric definitely has its pros and cons when it comes to its use.

Pros of Landscape Fabric

Some of the benefits of using landscaping fabric include:

  • Keeps inorganic mulches like rocks from sinking into the soil.

  • Prevents weed seeds covered by fabric from sprouting.

  • Reduces the need for herbicidal weed control.

  • Works well on slopes where erosion is a problem.

  • Helps the soil retain moisture.

Cons of Landscape Fabric

Some of the cons of using landscaping fabric include:

  • Over time, decomposing particles of mulch and soil clog the perforations in the cloth, which keep adequate amounts of water and air from reaching the plant roots leading to the plant’s decline.

  • Earthworms, which aerate the soil, don’t develop, leading to compacted and unhealthy soil.

  • The fabric acts as a barrier to organic materials biodegrading in the soil, which lead to an unhealthier soil structure.

  • Weeds can still grow in the mulch used to cover the fabric.

  • Landscape fabric is time-consuming to install, especially around existing plantings.

Is Landscape Fabric the Right Choice for Your Project?

If used properly and in the best situations, landscaping fabric does have its benefits, but it does have its drawbacks.

Although it might work for a time in reducing weeds in an area, the unwanted growth eventually rears its ugly head despite the weed barrier.

Over time, you also end up with soil that isn’t as healthy, which can affect your plants and their health.

Something else worth noting: Landscape fabric won’t last forever.

Landscaping fabric generally works as a weed barrier for a year or less before its usefulness starts declining.

In fact, and according to the University of Florida, its long-term use can negatively affect soil and plant health and is best used where ornamental plants aren’t growing like pathways or around mailboxes.

How to install weed matting

Install weed matting on the garden

First, remove all the weeds from the area you want to cover. Then roll out the weed mat onto your garden bed and cut it to size with scissors. Now peg it in place using either metal or plastic pegs. If your ground is a bit hard, you might need to use a hammer.

Put plants in through the weed matting

Now place each plant pot on top of the weed mat and trace a circle around it with your marker. Draw an “X” inside the circle and cut along those lines. Now fold back the four corners to make the hole for your plant. Once you have done all your planting, finish by covering the matting with 5-10cm of mulch.

What Is the Difference between Needle Punched Cotton and Non-Woven Fabric?

Needle-punched cotton belongs to the non-woven industry. Needle-punched cotton is a kind of non-woven fabric, including many non-woven fabrics, such as spun lace, needle punch, hot air, spun-bond, melt blown, electrostatic spinning, stitch-bonding, wet method, etc. Needle-punched cotton is made of polyester fiber through a non-woven needle punching process. It is also through the opening, mixing, carding, laying, needle punching, and winding of polyester fibers into cloth. But everyone is called needle-punched cotton, but they are not familiar with needle-punched cotton as non-woven fabric. The range of non-woven fabrics is very large, which is a cross-category between traditional crafts. For example, spunbond is close to the plastics industry. The wet process is close to the paper industry. Needling is close to the carpet industry. Below, the non-woven fabric manufacturers share the differences between the two.

1. Different raw materials

Needle-punched cotton: The raw material of needle-punched cotton is polyester fiber.

Non-woven fabric: The raw material of the non-woven fabric is polypropylene pellets, oriented or random fibers.

2. Different production methods

Needle-punched cotton: Needle-punched cotton is made by needle-punching fibers directly into flakes without weaving.

Non-woven fabrics: Non-woven fabrics are produced by a continuous one-step process of high-temperature melting, spinning, laying, and hot-pressing of raw materials.

3. The characteristics are different

Needle-punched cotton: Needle-punched cotton has the characteristics of high density, thin thickness, and firm texture.

Non-woven fabric: Non-woven fabric has the characteristics of flexibility, lightweight, non-combustibility, easy decomposition, non-toxic, and non-irritating.

4. Different applications

Needle-punched cotton: Needle-punched cotton can be used not only in the field of clothing, but also in industries, filtration, automobiles, air coolers, furniture, home textiles, medical care products, cushions, and thermal insulation series.

Non-woven fabrics: Non-woven fabrics can be used in medical, health, agriculture, clothing, and other fields, as well as in construction and aerospace fields.

In general, the difference between needle-punched cotton and the non-woven fabric is that the raw materials are different, the production methods are different, and the characteristics are different.

Silt Fencing

The purpose of silt fencing is to detain runoff flows so that deposition of transported sediment can occur through settlement. They are not used to filter sediment out of runoff.

We install silt fences:

  • Where there is a need to control sediment by intercepting sheet flow

  • Where a site is low gradient, or is confined with a small contributing catchment, such as short batter fills and around watercourses

  • To delineate the limit of disturbance on an earthworks site, such as riparian areas or bush reserves

  • Where installation of an earth or topsoil bund would destroy sensitive areas, such as bush and wetlands.

  • To provide a barrier that can collect and hold debris and soil, preventing the material from entering critical areas, watercourses or streets.

Evergreen Landcare has the required expertise:

  • Silt fence and super silt fence

  • Supply and install to GD05 standard

  • 100 plus metres achieved per day

  • Fast response fast turn around

  • Machine or manual option available

Ways To Use Nonwoven Fabric For Agriculture

While the agricultural industry isn’t the biggest user of nonwovens, it is nevertheless taking advantage of the technology; in fact, the use of the technology in agriculture is increasing year by year. There are a number of reasons for this. Firstly, more farmers are being made aware of the many cost-effective benefits that nonwoven technology can impart to farming and agriculture.

Secondly, nonwovens are providing alternatives to more traditional ways of doing things, such as providing better protection for crops from the sun, especially during dry seasons. Thirdly, people are coming up with ways to use nonwovens in different settings, including agriculture.

There are many reasons why nonwovens are ideally suited for agricultural uses. They can, for example, help improve productivity and efficiency in managing greenhouses, increasing crop yield, estimating labor needs, and, possibly, reducing the need for pesticides.

What is great about nonwovens is that they are generally not one-size-fits-all, pre-made, come-in-uniform-bundles products—instead, they are state-of-the-art, custom-fit, and specifically tailored to tackle one job or need type of product. Most people have to go shopping to see what products fit their needs; when it comes to nonwovens, though, it’s the other way around.

The agricultural industry finds a need or thinks of a way to address a problem and then they ask the nonwoven industry to tailor-make something that will adequately address that need cost-effectively. In most instances, those needs have been met or continue to be met as the industry finds new ways to use nonwoven technology.

In some cases, the nonwoven industry has proposed a solution that the agricultural industry accepted and ultimately put to good use.

Some of the characteristics that make nonwovens very useful, if not indispensable, for the agricultural industry include:

  • Heat control and sealability

  • Hydrophilic and hydrophobic capacity

  • Can be excellent covering material with graduated-to-need air permeability

  • Moisture absorption, in the amount/percentage needed

  • Good light transmittance (especially useful for greenhouses and other ways)

  • 2% to 3% UV protection capability

  • Suppression of weed growth without the use of dangerous chemicals

  • Photo synthesis enhancement or reduction, as needed

  • Helping to keep heat lower to the ground; helping to increase or decrease ground temperature, as needed

  • Helping to avoid damage to fruit and root by managing air permeability properly

  • Biodegradable materials

  • Helping to enhance the effects of fertilizers; preventing loss thereof

  • Helping to reduce disease possibilities, such as by not allowing too much water to accumulate

  • Helping to manage pest problems and, thus, reducing crop losses

  • Helping to keep the soil moist and loose

  • Helping to reduce need for irrigation (probably one of the biggest costs for agriculture)


How to: Put on Snow Chains and Drive Safely

If you travel to the mountains or snowy areas regularly, sooner or later you’re going to have to use tire chains. Start by getting the right set for your vehicle at your local Les Schwab.

Quick-fit chains are not your grandpa’s tire chains. They are MUCH simpler to put on and take off. Here are a video, step-by-step instructions, and driving safety tips for installing quick-fit tire chains on your vehicle.

When you need chains, driving conditions are nasty. Snow is coming down, passing traffic is spraying slush, dirty water is dripping off your wheel wells, the road is slick, and it may be dark. Don’t make this the first time you put on your chains.

  1. Practice installing your new chains once BEFORE you travel. Take advantage of a dry garage or driveway to make sure your winter tire chains are the right size and you’re comfortable putting them on. If needed, the professionals at Les Schwab Tire Centers can help.

  2. Put together a simple winter road trip safety kit with warm gloves, waterproof layers, and other items to make your winter driving more safe and comfortable. In the winter, always carry this emergency kit and tire chains in your vehicle.

Once you’re comfortable installing your chains, you’re ready to hit the snow.

  1. Be Safe. If you’re on the road, pull off as far as possible onto a safe shoulder. Flip on your hazard lights. Put on your waterproof layers, hat, headlamp, and gloves from your winter road trip kit.

  2. Identify the Correct Tires. If your vehicle is front-wheel drive, the chains go on the front. If it’s rear-wheel drive, chains go on the back. If it’s all-wheel drive, please check your owner’s manual. If you’re not sure, you can ask the experts at Les Schwab for help.

  3. Pull Out Chains & Instructions. With your vehicle parked, open the bag and pull out your instructions and your first chain. Each bag comes with two chains. The plastic instruction mat that comes with your chains can be used as a barrier between you and the snow to keep you dry. Untangle Your Chains. Holding them from the plastic-covered cable, make sure everything is straight and the chains are not looped over one another. Hold up your chains so the yellow end is in your left hand and the blue end is in your right.

When Should You Use Tire Chains?

Few feelings equal that panicked moment when your vehicle loses traction on an icy, snow-packed road. You feel that sideways drift start to influence the car. You feel less and less control in the shuddering steering wheel. You feel the car fighting against it. You do your best to compensate, perhaps making the right decisions, perhaps making the wrong ones. Your safety is up in the air for that moment. And to think it could be solved by simply applying tire chains.

Most who know that moment also know the overwhelming sense of relief when it passes, when you regain control over your vehicle. You slow down by instinct even without thinking about it. You become hyper-alert. Maybe you flick your lights on even if it's daytime and the sun is out. Whatever adds to your safety in even the smallest way is now of paramount importance.

Some don't know that sense of relief because they never regained control. They ended up in a crash, perhaps stranded for a time in a snowstorm, perhaps injured or worse. The most important way to decrease this risk is to drive safely and cautiously in bad conditions. Keeping your car in good condition and well maintained is also important. The third element of safe winter driving is your tires. Depending on state law, you must consider: winter tires, studded tires, and the most effective of all – using tire chains.

Tire chains are chains that you secure around your tires. They're designed to take advantage of the weight of your car to dig into the snow and ice as you drive. There's a learning curve to putting on the chains for the first time, but once you've got the process down, it becomes very easy.

To imagine how they work, picture gardening. You pull a weed with smooth leaves, but you lose your grip. The weed slides right out of your hand. Now picture pulling that same weed with rough-surfaced gardening gloves on. That texture makes it much easier to get the weed up.

Alternately, picture catching a football. Try it with your bare hands and a hard pass might slip through your fingers. Use textured wide receiver gloves and the ball just about stops in your hands because you have so much more grip. Using tire chains gives you grip. You won't be prone to slide or slip on the road with them.

How do tire chains work?

Tire chains are used to help vehicles get through especially heavy or dense snow on the road. Usually tire chains are used in mountainous areas that see a lot of snow throughout the winter. So how do they work? It’s actually pretty simple. Traction and wheel spin are the two factors at play here.

Traction

Tire chains wrap around the tread of the tires and latch tightly to prevent them from slipping. Basically, they allow the tires to get a better grip on snow and ice covered roads, giving the vehicle more traction and better control. Different size chains are manufactured for different tire sizes, so make sure to get the right size. Using the wrong size tire chains can damage your tires.

Wheel spin

In addition to gaining traction by biting into the snowy surface, tire chains also increase traction by preventing wheel spin. Wheel spin happens when the force delivered to the tire tread via the engine is greater than the tread-to-surface friction available, which makes the tires lose traction.

Tire chains are very useful for driving through the snow, but they do carry certain restrictions. You shouldn’t go faster than 30pmh when driving with tire chains. In addition, driving on bare asphalt with tire chains can shorten their lifespan.

Things About Tire Chains while Driving Truck on Winter Snow

1. Keep to a Safe Speed

Tire chains are only intended to withstand a certain amount of punishment. Drivers should never exceed speeds of 30 mph when chained. Going any faster could cause chains to break while in motion. This could be dangerous for drivers and vehicles alike.

2. Avoid Bare Pavement

Tire chains do not hold up well against bare pavement either. So while there may be some instances when it’s necessary to drive short distances on bare pavement, the practice should be avoided as much as possible. As soon as a driver gets through the area of snow-covered roads, he or she should find a place to pull off and remove the chains.

3. Chains Slip-on Pavement

Something else to note about chains is they tend to slip on bare pavement. If a driver is braking on the bare pavement while still chained up, he/she has to be more gentle in the process. It is very easy to lock up the wheels and slide on chains. On the other end, hitting the gas too aggressively could cause the drive wheels to spin on bare pavement. Drivers should accelerate slowly.

4. Routine Inspections Are Necessary

Truckers will naturally tighten their chains when first deploying them. However, it is generally recommended that chains be inspected and re-tightened at regular intervals. Chains will loosen as the miles roll by, making them subject to breakage.

5. Chained Tighteners Can Cause Problems

Chain tightening devices have a tendency to pull chains off-center if they are not used the right way. A driver who is not intimately familiar with how to use such a device should avoid doing so. There are other ways to effectively tighten chains.

6. State Regulations for Using Tire Chains

Nearly every state in the union has some sort of regulations in place pertaining to tire chains. Truck drivers should make themselves familiar with those regulations in any state where they plan to work during the winter months. Running afoul of the regulations could result in a citation.

Along those same lines, there are a few key regions in the U.S. where chains are mandatory during the winter. Must know about trucking chain laws by state in the USA. In some of these regions, truckers will find chains at highway department chain banks. A word to the wise though: drivers should not rely solely on chain banks to meet their needs. If no chains are available when a driver reaches the start of a mandatory chain area, he or she will have to wait until a set is available.

Winter Driving: When Should You Use Tire Chains For Cars?

Losing traction in the snow is no one’s idea of a good time. Even in areas not known for abysmal snowstorms, winter can create icy and hazardous road conditions that drivers must be prepared to deal with. Adding tire chains for cars can be a workable solution to get you where you need to go when the roads are not your friend — but they can also be a pain.

Knowing when to employ chains can help you get out of a slippery situation, but you have to know what you’re doing first.

TECHNICALLY SPEAKING

Different laws regulate chain usage in different states. Before you invest in a shiny new pair, make sure you know whether chains are illegal, permitted or even required in some cases. Generally, a chain “requirement” means you must have them in your vehicle if you want to pass certain checkpoints that pop up in inclement weather. Places where chains are permitted usually come with some disclaimer that restrict their usage, so make sure you know the law and follow it.

The other important factor to consider is whether your vehicle is suitable for chains. You can find chains for most tire sizes, but there must be enough clearance for them to fit on without causing damage to the body, undercarriage or brakes. Consult your owner’s manual for specifications and allowances.

BE PREPARED

Because chains are something you will likely need to take on and off at least once per trip, and because the conditions surrounding their use are usually cold, soggy and snowy, it’s best to practice installation first, ideally when the weather is still nice. Without driving the car anywhere, put them on and take them off a couple of times to get the hang of it so that when you do eventually need them, you aren’t stuck fumbling and trying to figure out how to get them on with freezing fingers. Also, if you’re carrying chains, pack a safety vest as well. There’s a good chance you’ll have to pull onto the side of the road at some point to adjust or remove them, and if it’s snowing, visibility will be low.
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